░░▒▒▒▓▓▓▒▒▒░░ (masstreble) wrote,
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masstreble

  • Music:

Anti-fan is the new fan!

Apparently, I have to hate people who make things I like in order to make the things I like happy and to look cool.

Did you understand that statement? Me, neither, but I'll show you how it seems to work. It's a story of how the actions of a suprising few can result in disaster.

For example, say I like the web-comic DMFA. If I talk about that, people might seem me as a CRAZED mindless FANBOY -- something that is essentially universally hated from what I've seen. Also, many of this generation seem to hate the very idea of people liking their works: look at how the author of Johny the Homicidal Maniac and Invader Zim acts! Fanboys, fangirls, something you look down at, not something you want to be. Getting back to the example, what am I supposed to do? I like DMFA, but I don't want to be some creepy stalker fanboy.

...I've got it! I don't like DMFA! It's vapid, and Amber Panyko is a stupid bitch! Ah-hah! Now there's a solution. Nobody can accuse me of a being a fanboy: I'll just laugh and call them stupid -- I'm DMFA's biggest critic. I'm not an Amber Panyko fanatic or stalker: p'faww, why should I care about that wannabe? Well, okay, she's funny sometimes, and the comic is alright, so I guess I kind of read it... but that's it.

Isn't this a horrible end-point? I see those self-defense mechanisms all the time, both in others and uncomfortably frequently from myself. It has so much power behind it, though: with communities like fantards and the like floating around, it's as if it isn't safe to love something.
Tags: culture, fustrations, internet culture, social, thoughts
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